Category Archives: Business

The Category Business changed to Self-Gamification and Business.

Self-gamification is the term I use for the gameful approach I use to project, time and my life’s management.

I try to approach all areas of my life gamefully, and this includes my work and my business. Therefore all former Business blog posts remain in this category. Apart from that, I moved the 5 Minute Perseverance blog posts into this category.

Take Control of Your Business in 3D

The amazing editor and cover designer for my books, Alice Jago (@shorelinesdesigns), has created fantastic 3D images for all of my books (including those available for sale and the one I am finishing right now 😊). I want to share these images one-by-one with you and include a quote from each of the books.

Here is a quote from Take Control of Your Business:

“Understanding the concept of business rules is vital for the efficiency of your business. It allows you to bring all the decisions made throughout the life span of your product or service, including all decisions about processes, into one consistent knowledge base. The key is to start recording all decisions as early as possible — even as soon as the idea of your product or service first appears — and keep track of them in a consistent manner.”

For the full list of my books go to Books.

#threedimensional #bookimage #bookcover #design #business #businessrules #knowledgebase #quotes #takecontrolofyourbusiness #productmanagement #decisionmaking #businessdecisions #businessdecisionmaking #book #OptimistWriter

Optimist Writer is Three Years Old

Three years ago Optimist Writer was officially born. Three years of age are the children when they go to kindergarten in Denmark. So this business baby of mine has reached its kindergarten years. What an adventure!

Here is what I have written in a free little ebook I called Turn Your No Into Yes: 15 Yes-Or-No Questions to Disentangle Your Project when Optimist Writer was less than half a year old:

“Whatever your project is, you have the ability to turn it into a valuable and enjoyable game, gathering many unforgettable experiences.

Every project, however tiny, if given enough attention and peeled off worries, can bring inspiration and eagerness to do more, to create more.”

That is still very true. Ok, worries aside. Here is to many more adventures and years of the Optimist Writer. I mean, isn’t it fantastic that among many other fun projects I get to write and teach about optimism, mood uplifting and increase of motivation?

A great and brilliant day to anyone who reads this message! 🙂

 

Copyright © 2018 by Victoria Ichizli-Bartels

#OptimistWriter #birthday #youngbusiness #adventure #motivation #optimism #positiveness #entrepreneurship #entrepreneur #SelfGamification

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If you are looking to turn your life into fun games, then click on the link or the figure below and enroll in the online video course Motivate Yourself by Turning Your Life into Fun Games.

If you would like to motivate yourself or someone else to persevere through a task or activity then read 5 Minute Perseverance Game: Play Daily for a Month and Become the Ultimate Procrastination Breaker.

If you struggle with your writing process and could use a cheer from a colleague, who might have gone through similar challenges, then I invite you to check out the book:

and join the facebook group with the same name “Cheerleading for Writers.”

Business Blog Category Becomes Self-Gamification

I would like to inform all subscribers to my blog posts in Business and Writing blog categories on the changes that I made today.

The blog Business changed now to Self-Gamification, the term I use for the gameful approach I use to project, time and my life’s management.

I try to approach all areas of my life gamefully, and this includes my work and my business. Therefore all former Business blog posts remain in this category. Apart from that, I moved the 5 Minute Perseverance Game blog posts into this main blog category. They won’t be under Writing category as they were before, at least most of them won’t be, because the 5 Minute Perseverance Game and other derivatives of this game have to do more with project and time management than purely with writing.

I hope these changes won’t bring any inconveniences to you and will continue to bring value to you as well as make you smile and help enjoy whatever you do.

Please don’t hesitate to ask me whatever questions you have on this. You can contact me at vib@optimistwriter.com.

P.S.: There is more to come on self-gamification. And I am excited to share these projects with you in the coming year.

P.P.S. from March 20, 2018. I have renamed this blog category into Self-Gamification and Business to include the pure business sub-categories of this blog into its title.

Credits: Photograph ©canva.com under the keyword “dice.”

Business Rules Memo – A new tool, a template, to help you get a thorough overview what you need to strengthen your products and services

When you start a business, you make a set of choices and decisions or choices. And you record them in your business plan.

When you come up with an idea for a product or service, you also make choices, and you record those in one way or another as decisions too. Some people call the collection of the product related decisions business rules.

You can find many useful templates for business plans, but you won’t find many of them for business rules. Or at least not simplified ones as those you can find in many variations for business plans.

Similar to business plans, the decisions you take toward your product or service, the business rules, can be structured in many different ways. But whatever method you choose or invent it will always be connected to the lifespan, or life cycle, of your product or service.

This article is not written to teach new terms. It is to introduce you to a tool which will equip you with a two-pages list of questions, which by answering it, will allow you to get an overview what a life cycle of a product embraces. You will identify what is missing, and what you could improve. By turning all the Nos, you have answered, into Yeses, you will get in control of your products, services as well as your business.

This tool is not offered for free. Especially when it comes to developing products, we all need to have a sense of investment. But its price, $4.99, is low enough to make it not only affordable (a bit more than a cup of coffee) but also attractive, since you will hardly find anything similar either in brevity and exactness or price on the topic of business rules.

And you do need to understand what business rules are and what understanding them can offer you. Because you already deal with business rules on a daily basis. Simply because you always make one or another decision on your products and services.

So if you would like to find out more about this simple yet effective set of questions that will let you start a sound foundation of the knowledge base for the decisions you make on your products and services, then go to the Tools page on this site (optimistwriter.com) and click on “The Business Rules Memo.”

There is No Successful Business (or Project) Without Efficient Communication

This past weekend, I finished revising my something-in-between-of-tenth-and-twentieth-draft of the book with the following title “Take Control of Your Business: Learn what Business Rules are, discover that you are already using them, then update them to maximize your business success,” and sent it to my editor for the final edit.

On the day I sent the manuscript out, I discovered that I wrote the book within four months and revised it within about a year.

I’ve learned a lot during this extensive revising period.

The most helpful and biggest lesson I’ve learned was a concept, which accompanied me during all these twelve months of revision. This concept or rather a process was communication. I wouldn’t have been able to improve my book, as I did, without discussing the book and its ideas with different people and listening to their opinions to see how they resonated with me and with what I wanted to communicate.

Here is what I have written in a section of a chapter on management business rules, which I called “Let’s Emphasize the Importance of Communication” (Note: the editor I work with didn’t have a chance to edit my text in the excerpt below yet):

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‘I found an enlightening answer in a book about marketing — a business process non-existent without efficient and effective communication. Martin Stellar, a business coach, and writer introduced a particular art marketing system in “Take Control of Your Art Business,” Book 1 in the series of “The LEAP Art Marketing Series.” Based on twenty years of his studies and experience in psychology, business, marketing, and sales, he developed a system he calls LEAP, which is an acronym:

“First, you LISTEN to what your ideal audience wants and in what way they like to be approached.

Next, you EXPLAIN: who you are, what inspires you, how and why you create your art, and why people ought to take a close look at it or buy from you.

Then you ASK: you can ask for a sale, ask for a response, or for people to visit your show — whatever the context and purpose, you always need to ask people to take some sort of action.

Once you master these three things, that’s when you get to the final part of the LEAP system: You get to PROSPER as an artist.”

I am convinced that if you start with listening to your customer, after that explain what you can offer, and finally ask for action without forgetting to tell what your actions will be, then your business will prosper, whether it is an art or an engineering, a small or a large business.’

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The modern world, similar to its predecessors I suppose, is full of paradoxes. And the most striking is that, on the one hand, the Internet seems both to connect us with, and on the other, separate us from each other. It connects us globally but locally, in a family or with friends, it tends to separate us from each other. At the same time, we complain that mobile phones and computers isolate us more and more from each other, but simultaneously, there is almost nothing you can do today — either in private life or especially in business areas — without the participation of others.

The whole marketing process is about communication, even when a marketing specialist sits alone in her cubicle or office at her computer and prepares a presentation. She does every single bit of her work with a customer, receiver of the information she compiles for, in mind.

But also other areas of business, including design, production, sales, management and all the other, involve one or another form of communication. Often all types of them, both in personal (face-to-face), remote (on the phone), directly written through emails or direct messages on social media, or in a subtle way, by viewing their profile on LinkedIn or other media. These are all communication. Even the intention to talk to someone is already a part of communication.

So why are we so keen on improving production processes, the communication tools, various business processes, but often forget to take care of the ways we communicate? Is it because then we would need to slow down and pay attention? Slow down enough to be able to listen, to have adequate time to explain and ask for action, so that the potential customers or partners in a project get interested and keen to join us in our endeavour? To make our project a project of their own? Won’t this make us all prosper in the end?

What will happen if I slow down? If I pay attention to how I communicate with my partners and customers in various projects? If I forget for a moment about all those important agendas, I have almost at each moment? What if this approach will result in growth, stability, and longevity of my business and benefit all involved in or relating to it? If so (and I am sure it is so), then I am all for it.

What about you?

Picture: among the pictures I made in the past month, I realized how much this one of a pavement reminded me of a smooth and harmonious communication. If all stones are laid with care, without any gaps or difference in height between them, then a walk on them is effortless. But if the path is uneven and with holes in it, mishaps are almost preprogramed.

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Copyright © 2017 by Victoria Ichizli-Bartels